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Limpopo

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Limpopo a perfect access into the Kruger Park

Recently renamed after the river that forms its northern border, the Limpopo Province’s diverse landscape includes mountains and savannah. The Drakensberg and Waterberg (a major conservation area) lie to the south, while to the north lie the Soutpansberg and 3 entrances into the Kruger National Park.
The province is home to the headquarters of the Zion Christian Church, and every Easter over three million members gather at Zion City to celebrate Christ’s resurrection.
In a more ancient tradition, the Rain Queen Modjadji rules in the misty mountains where the Modjaji cycad, a living fossil, still grows.

Its tropical vegetation and abundance of locally grown fruit and vegetables also make it a cheap area to travel in. The name of the province has been changed to Limpopo, and some town names have changed. You should still see the old and new names together for a while longer though.

Kipling's Limpopo

“Go to the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, and find out.”
From The Elephant’s Child by Rudyard Kipling

Jock of the Bushveld

Once home to vast herds of game, ivory hunters, slave traders, prospectors and adventurers, a legacy of stories and tales still entrance the visitor. It is here that Sir Percy Fitzpatrick’s brave hearted “Jock of the Bushveld” roamed.

Bushveld Igneous Complex

As is so common in this region, massive upheavals some 600 million years ago caused molten rivers of lava to flow over, with increasing pressure, into the sedimentary rock of the Transvaal System. This mineral-rich molten rock contains vast deposits of platinum, chrome, tin, iron, copper, nickel and asbestos, as well as rich deposits of diamonds. Geologically, the area is named the Bushveld Igneous Complex and its rich mineral deposits have resulted in vast mining operations.

Mighty baobab trees dwarf elephants and lush orchards fringe roadsides where numerous stalls sell cheap farm-fresh fruit, vegetables and nuts.