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Vaalwater

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Leaders in conservation

The Waterberg lies to the west of the N1 and stretches for 150 km from Thabazimbi to Lapalala River. This is a unique area in South Africa. Its beauty lies in its mountain gorges, clear streams and rolling hills which are rich with indigenous species of flora and fauna. The mountains are steeped in history with many rock art and geological sites. Once a lake and swampland area, the plateau now supports a diverse amount of vegetation and wildlife as well as some of the country’s leading conservation projects. About 20% of the Waterberg is now under formal conservation management. This project is under private management – the Waterberg Conservancy is an association of landowners who have dedicated their efforts to re-establishing and conserving endangered species and habitats. Approximately 6 000 square kilometers of the Waterberg has been turned into a conservation area with elephants, white rhino, leopard and buffalo as local residents. There are over 300 bird species listed - a bird watcher’s paradise. Its history dates back to the Stone Age and features significantly in the country's cultural and sociopolitical development. Towns in the area are home to different clans of the Bapedi, Tswana and Basotho tribes as well as descendants of the Voortrekkers.