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Etosha National Park

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Nobody quite knows how Etosha came to be, but some geologists believe that a large inland lake was fed by a great river which changed its course and left the lake to dry up and shrink to its current size. There are three camps in the park - Namutoni, Okaukuejo, Onkoshi, Dolomite and Halali.

Zebra and springbok are scattered across the endless horizon, while the many waterholes attract endangered black rhinoceros, lion, elephant and large numbers of antelope.

During the drier months from June to November the water points exert a magnetic pull on the big game herds, and forms the centrepiece for visitors looking to see the nearly 150 mammal species to found in the park, including several rare and endangered species such as the Black Rhino, Black-faced Impala, Tssesebe and Gemsbok.